Education

The Future of Open: Photos by Nick Ierodiaconou

The Future of Open research project by the London OI included live events starting 1 July - 3 July through an exhibition, with fringe events in the evening, followed by a live speaking event on the 6th July 2013 at Mother London.

An exhibit of projects illustrating Open across a range of sectors and domains, including education, community projects, technology / hardware, and finance.

Taking the Future of Open exhibit to Mother London at 10 Redchurch St, EC2.

Tristan Copley-Smith presents Open Creatives, a proposed archive of open source digital files across the creative field.

A shot of the Share Your Idea session at the Future of Open event where individuals pitched ideas that could be shared or supported through an Open Institute.

Visit the http://www.oi-london.org.uk/ to share your ideas, and stay tuned for upcoming events.

You can also follow the Open Institute on twitter @OI_Ldn

-OT

The Future of Open: Video by Nick Ierodiaconou

 

video above

captures some of the 'Future of Open' day held Saturday 6th July - a day of futurescoping, sharing ideas and practice in the applications of Open both present and imminent. See the blog for access to the full stream of events on the day, plus slides from presenters. Enjoy!

Read a summary of the event from the OI blog here.

Visit the http://www.oi-london.org.uk/ to share your ideas, and stay tuned for upcoming events.

You can also follow the Open Institute on twitter @OI_Ldn

-OT

Open Institute London website launch by Nick Ierodiaconou

How open are cities? That’s an important question, about social justice and democracy, as well as economic growth and the prosperity of the city in the 21st century. We know that cities are often places of innovation – engines for new ideas. What is less clear is how, as they 'succeed', they can continue to offer the generous conditions that enabled that innovation happen. As traditional commons – parks, pavements, libraries – are being joined by new kinds of commons around shared knowledge, open big data and resources such as Wikipedia, Creative Commons, FabLabs and Trade Schools, this project is asking: what are the new urban Commons, and how should they be governed?

This is an open call to co-develop a 21st century Open institution, starting with the OI London.

London has plans to develop an OI – an ambitious infrastructure that seeks to offer new opportunities for Open education, enterprise, and everyday life for its citizens.

This could be achieved via a range of shared resources; spaces, tools, and platforms. Which are then put them in a commons, where anyone can access them.

The first instance of the OI is being developed in London, backed by £50m investment from the government. And the institution itself will be shared so that other cities can create their own OI.

Visit the http://www.oi-london.org.uk/ to share your ideas, and stay tuned for upcoming events.

You can also follow the Open Institute on twitter @OI_Ldn

- DS

TEDTalk: Architecture for the people, by the people by Nick Ierodiaconou

Full video available now - watch here!

Designer Alastair Parvin presents a simple but provocative idea: what if, instead of architects creating buildings for those who can afford to commission them, regular citizens could design and build their own houses? The concept is at the heart of WikiHouse, an open source construction kit that means just about anyone can build a house, anywhere.

"As a society we’ve never needed design thinking more,” says Alastair Parvin, but most people -- particularly those in cities of growing density and poverty -- can’t afford it. Parvin, who was trained in architecture but chooses to make a career looking for ideas beyond its conventional framework, wants to change that.

He is one of a team behind WikiHouse, an open-source construction set that allows anyone to freely share model files for structures, which can then be downloaded, "printed" via CNC cutting machine and easily assembled. Parvin calls WikiHouse a very early experiment, the seed of what he sees as design’s great project in the 21st century: the democratization of production.

Text from TED.com, read and watch more here.

Follow Wikihouse at @wikihouse or www.wikihouse.cc/

- DS

A civic commons for Silicon Roundabout by Nick Ierodiaconou

Architecture 00 are continuing to lead proposals for a new civic institution for London at Old Street Roundabout. In the last few years, the emergence of an extraordinary cluster of young creative and technology startups around the area of East London have lead Old Street Roundabout to be dubbed 'Silicon Roundabout, and been part of the wider support from the government for Tech City across East London. Yet the roundabout itself remains something of a neglected underpass.

Working with local partners,  00 are developing proposals for a new civic space for London; an open 'commons', owned and operated in the community interest. It will be a building providing workshop spaces, exhibition spaces, event hosting, free workspaces, education and innovation accelerators: in short, a low-threshold point of entry for everyone – from the international investor to the London teenager who wants the opportunity to turn their idea into a startup.

The project will also include a significant upgrade to the whole public realm, including proposals to create a pedestrian peninsular, and safer cycle routes across the junction, which has become notorious as a cycling black-spot in the city.

Driven by the impetus of the local community and startups, 00 are working with the Greater London Authority, Transport for London, London Borough of Islington, London Borough of Hackney, the Tech City Investment Organisation to progress the project through technical feasibility stage.

"We have a last mile crisis" by Nick Ierodiaconou

From the HUB Westminster blog, an opinion piece written by Co-Founder of HUB Westminster and Director of 00:/, Indy Johar.

During the last year I have had the privilege to travel far and wide – talking to some of the great change makers from across the world. I have met well educated and articulate people seeking to reinvent the social economy  through new platforms for giving, sharing, contributing and trading – covering all sorts of markets – clothing, food, energy markets – corporate structures and financial systems. All of which very impressive, and yet I have left many of these amazing conversations unsatisfied, with an empty feeling that was until recently undefined and certainly not understood by me.

For outside these amazing meetings, as I recently witnessed in San Francisco their is a growing reality of homelessness and unemployment viscerally visible while the remnants of capitals from the last boom perish in a waft of smoke and hopelessness. Depression, crime and disenfranchisement increasingly prevail in the every day lives of the people. It is these problems that will not be vanquished by the elaborated speeches & civic technology of educated men.

Don’t get me wrong, we need to build these new platforms and civic markets and they are essential in rebuilding a radically democratic economy. What worries me is that unfortunately, we have destroyed the last mile in the chain to enable for this new social wealth created by the platform economy to be distributed in every last corner of our developed world...

Continue reading here.

 

-DS

Winner of National "Regeneration & Renewal Award for Boosting High Street Vitality" by Nick Ierodiaconou

New Windows on Willesden Green, in Brent, was announced as the winner of the 2012 Regeneration & Renewal award for boosting high street vitality. Voted by industry experts, New Windows on Willesden Green was up against tough competition. In the category were:

  • High Street Recovery Programme, submitted by Birmingham City Council
  • Improving Local Retail Environments, London, submitted by Facility Architects & Consultants
  • Leyton High-Street-Life, submitted by Waltham Forest Council
  • Love Kettering Markets, submitted by Kettering Borough Council
  • New Windows on Willesden Green, submitted by the London Borough of Brent
  • Regeneration of Bridge Street, Worksop, submitted by Bassetlaw District Council

This award was given to a project that has "successfully revived a local high street, or sustained its vitality against the odds", with "objective evidence that entries have improved or helped to improve the physical or environmental quality of a place or the economic or social well-being of a community".

Queens Parade
Queens Parade

New Windows in Willesden Green was the GLA's Outer London Fund project delivered in partnership by Brent Council, The Architecture Foundation, Meanwhile Space, Blue Consulting and 00:/. The legacy of the project is still very much in place with Queens Parade, The Library Lab and now Electric House offering exciting opportunities to local people and businesses in the Willesden Green area of Brent.

The Library Lab is so proud to be part of the winning team, congratulations and a big thank you to everyone who was involved!

-DS

Scarce Times: Alternative Futures by Nick Ierodiaconou

00 with Alma-Nac and artist/designer (& local resident) Diana Matoso have been selected as one of four teams in the Architecture Foundation & Scarcity and Creativity in the Built Environment (SCIBE) Scarce Times: Alternative Futures competition. Our joint submission - a community-led vision for the Bromley-by-Bow area - looks to uncover and bring together existing initiatives with latent resources - to build a truly do-it-yourself template for regeneration. The team will be working up this approach together with local residents and artist/makers over the coming months.

Press Release:

The Architecture Foundation are pleased to announce the winning teams of our collaborative Scarce Times: Alternative futures competition.  The selected groups are:

COMMUNITY COLLABOR-8 (Naznin Chowdhury, Carlos Manns and Nick Wolff)

BOW-NANZA (Dominic McKenzie and Peter Morris, Signs of Life [Bromley-by-Bow Centre], Spacehive and 815 Agency)

00 ALMA-NAC (Joni Stenier, Olivia Tusinski, Chris Bryant with Diana Matoso)

A BOOM COLLABORATION (Mike Whitehurst, James Warne, Blanche Cameron, Gary Grant, Karen Ihlau, Evan Lizon and Mat Proctor)

The Architecture Foundation and Scarcity and Creativity in the Built Environment (SCIBE) at the University of Westminster sought to collaborate with four groups to work on a project with the community in Bromley-by-Bow, London. Rather than run a traditional selection competition we held two events at which teams presented themselves and their approach to the briefing document. Twenty-four teams presented at Event 1 (2 July 2012) and 14 of them continued on to Event 2 (23 July 2012).

From the presenting teams, the audience and the Jury – consisting of Nicola Bacon (Young Foundation/Social Life), Sarah Ichioka (Architecture Foundation), Moira Lascelles (Architecture Foundation), Flora Bowden (SEED Foundation), Deljana Iossifova (University of Westminster) and Jeremy Till (University of Westminster, Chair) – selected four groups with which the SCIBE team will collaborate over the next months to implement their projects. In addition, the jury decided to invite Alison Killing and Lutfa Begum + Sonia and Rania Khan to collaborate with one of the selected teams. Each team will be awarded £4,000 to begin implementing their respective projects over the following months.

Read more about Scare Times: Alternative Futures here.

Open Institute to be featured at City Hall by Nick Ierodiaconou

00 have been commissioned to exhibit an interactive display of their plans for the Open Institute to a global audience at London House (formerly known as City Hall) during the Olympics and Paralympics. The Open Institute will be a new civic accelerator institution for London, and the UK as whole; its aim is to do for technology, invention and creative entrepreneurialism what the Tate & Barbican have done for the Arts.

In recent years, 00s former home at Old Street has witnessed the explosive emergence of a cluster of technology and web startups. So much so that it has been dubbed ‘Silicon Roundabout’. Yet the roundabout itself, from which the area has taken its name, remains a conspicuous gap. The Open Institute will transform the roundabout into a civic institution; an extraordinary public space, a peer-to-peer university, a platform for investors and startups, and somewhere to go if you want to learn to code, to invest in the next big innovation, host events, or to turn your invention into a profitable business.

If you’re interested in shaping, supporting or being part of the project, do get in touch with us.

Lights, camera... The Library Lab in action by Nick Ierodiaconou

[vimeo]http://www.vimeo.com/44650366[/vimeo]  

The Library Lab has been up and running for five months now, and 00:/ are delighted to announce the project's extension till September 2012 at the Willesden Green Library Centre.

This short documentary on The Library Lab was made in partnership with CODOC, an award-winning documentary company dedicated to creating spaces for critical thought through media. CODOC are also based out of the co-working space at The Library Lab.

To find out more about The Library Lab, visit http://www.thelibrarylab.com

 

-DS

Grand Opening of SOAR Works by Nick Ierodiaconou

To our great delight, 00:/ have completed their latest new build:

On Friday 09th December 2011 SOAR Works (www.soarworks.co.uk), 00:/’s latest project, was officially opened by Sir Bob Kerslake Permanent Secretary Communities & Local Government, Cllr Julie Dore Leader Sheffield City Council & David Blunkett MP.

The building was commissioned for SOAR Enterprises Ltd, the trading arm of a community-led area regeneration partnership, and Sheffield City Council. The building provides artists’ studios, workshops, and workspaces for start-up enterprises and community organisations along with meeting and conferencing spaces in a flagship centre in Parson Cross, North Sheffield. SOAR Works aims to revitalise and improve the long term social and economic prospects of the local community through supporting and furthering arts and enterprise.

The design of SOAR Works represents the strategic aims and ambitions of the client and multi-headed grant funders. With a fixed capital budget from the outset, 00:/ led their multi-disciplinary subconsultant team, which included responsibility for cost control, from design competition to completion. Deploying the budget strategically to deliver both a landmark building and also affordable workspace, was fundamental to creating something of design excellence. The cantilevered entrance canopy and playful use of dichroic glass behind perforated security shutters on the South facade, provide a highly functional yet surprising statement at the heart of the regeneration area.The steel-framed and steel-clad (inside and out) design builds on Sheffield’s cultural heritage of industry and progressive workspaces.

SOAR Works was led by architects Sarah Hollingworth and David Saxby from 00:/, with the help of their partners Steve Fisher & Austen Cook (Momentum), Philip Boulcott & Michael Perkins (AppleyardsDWB) and Trevor Barrett & Lujun Zhou (pha/Foster & Partners) and their respective teams.

See photos of the interior design below, more photos to come!

David Saxby's RIBA Diary by Nick Ierodiaconou

riba_davidjournal
riba_davidjournal

"More self-interestedly, we sense that the formality of both architectural education and general practice risks marginalising the profession in an increasingly fluid world that is demanding new answers.  While the Arb-enshrined logic of consumer protection is understandable, real  innovation between disciplines requires a blurring of boundaries, roles and skills sets. Large and urgent issues face society and we need to pool everyone’s talents, based on merit not qualifications. Perhaps Arb and the RIBA should focus on this inclusive public good agenda"

00's David Saxby is a regular columnist to the RIBA journal, read his latest diary entry here.

DS

Scale-Free Schools by Nick Ierodiaconou

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[iframe width="360" height="270" src="http://player.vimeo.com/video/20320782"]

 

David and Alastair presented the Scale-Free Schools project at the BSEC conference this week, opening up a new angle on the current conversation about delivering schools in the UK. The end of big capital spending on new schools through the Building Schools for the Future programme has left an acrimonious debate as to whether or not the quality of the built environment matters to the ultimate aims of education, and a vacuum of ideas for how we can design and deliver new schools in an 'age of austerity'. But the question very few people have asked is, were the shining new institutional buildings of the boom-times really the most appropriate model for learning in the coming decades? Can we take their most successful elements and apply them in a smarter, more nimble way? What is the role of the community in education, and the role of education in communities?

Scale Free Schools is a design proposal for a new infrastructure of education in the 21st century. What do the changing roles of educators, new ideas for learning, emerging technologies and constrained resources mean for the infrastructure of learning?  Off the back of the project, these two videos were commissioned by Architecture + Design Scotland.

Launch of London Hackspace in Hoxton by Nick Ierodiaconou

London Hackspace had their space warming party on Sunday to celebrate their move into Cremer Street Business Centre so I went along to find out what was going on. As soon as you enter there’s the thrill of a workshop crossed with a mad inventors lab. I saw angle grinders next to a half repaired (or deconstructed?) bike, old school singer sewing machines, a workbench, an amazing open source 3D printer by makerbot industries that replicates itself and other tools and machines that i dont know the name of. Oh and a disco ball with flashing ligts. Hackspaces as i understand it, are places where like minded people can get together and tinker around, invent, make, play, exchange ideas and tips on many things. They describe it as a communal garden shed. I thought it might be limted to a few techy boffins playing with circuit boards and computer parts but that was just my limited interpretation of hackers. Actually the members of London hackspace don’t define hacker activity to a particular area. One described hacking to me as the act of taking, remaking anything – at London hackspace, this currently includes a planned knitting class (referred to as the first type of programming language), a lock picking sports club, bike repair shop, as well as the more techy activities of playing with circuit components and a tesla aerial (just because it made a cool noise when 4000volts was run through it).

There are quite a few precedences for hackspaces – I had previously come across the more well known ones such as the NYC Resistor in New York and c-base in Berlin – the Hackspace Foundation networks these spaces together. There’s clearly a real community feel to the crowd – faces being recognised from gatherings such as hackdays and dorkbotevents.

Having decamped from a shared space with an archery range where they were located for a year, London Hackspace are hoping this move to their own space means that they can grow their membership but also have the room to really have fun. The monthly membership is £40 (less if you can’t afford that) it’s 24/7 access, a proudly anarchistic operation(there are no strict rules or preset definitions of what goes) and people act very much in a shared spirit evidenced by the donated tools and kit and their openess to talk to anyone that is curious in learning.

There was much conversation on the fact that spaces and places like this don’t exist easily, particularly in London because of the commercialisation of space. How do we value these activities that are beyond hobbies but not quite “work” – yet their value in creating a skill and knowledge base is invaluable – and primarily the self taught education of exploring by doing and making. This is the real classroom that should be present in all neighbourhoods – not only do spaces like this spread knowledge and other ways of learning, they are a class in civil society itself. Go down to check it out.

AF

Scale-Free Schools by Nick Ierodiaconou

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To a surprising extent, the educational architecture we have inherited today still reflects the Victorian, industrial-age mindset which conceived it. Although we no longer think about education in that way, we still design schools as institutional factories for mass-education: purpose-built, expensive, one-size fits all.

As so many aspects of learning and social knowledge sharing have been revolutionised by new technology, the architecture of our schools has lagged behind. This project we’ve been working on in the office sets out to find smarter, leaner, more responsive architectures for 21st century learning, which require us to think beyond simply the design of buildings.
AP

 

Lets teach our kids to be entrepreneurs instead of lawyers… by Nick Ierodiaconou

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Inspiring talk from Cameron Herold at TEDxEdmonton on the need to encourage kids to be entrepreneurs. Its witty with stories from his own childhood in the skills he picked up in the everyday – from collecting unused coathangers from neighbours to sell on to the drycleaners to recognising a demand market in the form of 70 year old pensioners playing bridge and selling them sodas. Aside from the amusing anecdotes – the key issues here are that our educations systems and societal expectations are all geared towards pushing kids into fitting into box a, b or c. Those that don’t fit are viewed as wrong, troublesome or in need of help. And the result is a society that is simplistic in its approach to innovation and work. If you don’t fit in a certain way in a few professions you sit outside of mainstream economics and highlighted as an issue or problem to be solved (centrally) using the resources that are being gathered by an increasingly fewer number, or perhaps artificially sustained through the public purse in a seperate accounting column that does not deal with the systemic issues, or create the space to recognise that there is an issue in the first place.  I’d recommend pairing up this video with this article from the Economist “In search of serendipity” a review of ” The Power of Pull” by John Hagel, John Seely Brown and Lang Davison, which describes  theose connector people in business that make things happen. The article describes how the book presents a case for a different approach to business – that the platform technologies of today ie the internet, – challenge the top down approach to business that is perhaps still the standard in business schools. These are skills with nuances that cannot be translated solely into textbooks. As described in the article, “the “power of pull”, a term the authors define as “the ability to draw out people and resources as needed to address opportunities and challenges.” They propose a three-pronged pulling strategy. First, approach the right people (they call this “access”). Second, get the right people to approach you (attraction). Finally, use these relationships to do things better and faster (achievement).” Is our education system or even societal structures able to identify, understand and nurture these qualities as part of the story of enterprise and innovation?

Time to rethink the way we educate the next generation to be more prepared by reunderstanding how we value skills.

AF

 

TED Night by Nick Ierodiaconou

TED night at 00:/ On the evening of the 1st of April, while helicopters hovered over the G20 demonstrations outside, a diverse group of people gathered at the 00:/ office to watch lectures and discuss them. Using TED talks as stimulus, we tackled the social issues stemming from pervasive augmented reality technology, the effects of overwhelming choice, the effects of too little choice, the importance of long-view statistical visualisation, and the role of creativity in education. Among us were marketers, architects, social media strategists, ecological fashion designers, animators and 3D artists, bankers, all bringing valuable insights to remarkably in-depth conversations. The level of engagement with the topics was a very welcome change to the usual "dialogue" of media sound-bite versus placard slogan.

We hope that this will be one of many such events to come (possibly under the TEDx umbrella), and that it may further inform all of our activities.

OC

Brooklyn Superhero Supply Store by Nick Ierodiaconou

The Brooklyn Superhero Supply Store is a front orchestrated by 826NYC, a non-profit organisation that exists to encourage children to write creatively and to inspire teachers to encourage this further.

Within the shop is located a secret door that leads to an area filled up with reading and learning opportunities dedicated to supporting students ages 6-18 with their creative and expository writing skills. 

This appears to be an exceptionally good example of an environment that serves a wonderful idea that combines community interaction with learning and a sense of intrigue and imagination. I recommend you watch the video on their website: http://www.826nyc.org/about/826nyc/

LP